How to Wear Headphones with Glasses: Tips and Tricks

When wearing headphones, the most common complaint from bespectacled people is discomfort. Whether you’re a die-hard music fan or a professional gamer, chances are you use your headset frequently. If you wear glasses all the time, you’re probably wondering how to wear headphones with glasses.

That is a problem with which I am familiar. In my spare time, I enjoy not just listening to music but also playing video games. I wear headphones on a daily basis, as you could anticipate. And I haven’t been able to enjoy my hobbies as much as I used to since I started wearing glasses.

When I wore glasses and headphones at the same time, I was quite uncomfortable. They annoyed me so much that I had to move them around all the time. Itching, perspiration, and even discomfort were all present. Naturally, I needed to figure out what was wrong.

I started by asking around to see what other people who wore spectacles thought. I am a great believer in getting information right from the source. I then turned to Google for help. Needless to say, I picked up a lot of tips, some of which were more useful than others.

In this essay, I’d want to give the greatest advice I could discover, in the hopes that it would be useful to you. So, without further ado, let’s get down to business and show how you can wear glasses while listening to music with headphones.

Why Do We Feel Uncomfortable When We Wear Glasses With Headphones?

It’s likely that you’ll experience some discomfort and suffering when you first start wearing glasses. Fortunately, the problem will go away on its own once you adjust them to fit the shape of your head and become accustomed to wearing them. When you add headphones to the mix, though, you might be startled to discover that the problem reappears.

With that in mind, you might have the following experiences:

headaches caused by chafing in the outer ear

The problem is that the headphones put pressure on your glasses’ arms, causing them to burrow into the sides of your skull. The temples will begin to chafe the skin behind your ears when you move your head around, causing itching and stiffness in that area.

It’s also possible that the headset is too tight for you. If the headphones are overly tight, they will put too much pressure on your ear’s cartilage. The auricle will press against your glasses, obstructing normal blood flow and causing pain in the outer ear.

Furthermore, extremely tense headphones may cause a headache due to their firm hold on your temporal bones. This is a major issue for headphone users in general, and it’s made worse when the glasses’ stems dig into your scalp.

How to Wear Glasses with Headphones

After conducting extensive research on the subject, I discovered that doing the following measures helped me to alleviate my discomfort:

  • Adjusting the headband
  • Changing from in-ear to over-ear headphones
  • Taking some time off
  • Temples are being replaced.

Additionally, if you are a professional gamer or simply want to put a little more money into your gear, attempt these extra steps:

  • Get a second pair of glasses.
  • Try out a pair of neckband headphones.
  • Stretch the headband in the first step.

Since most of the issues I’ve discussed are caused by firm headphones, this seems like a clear answer to me. It should suit you perfectly if you stretch your headset to the Woman in boho style listening to musicright extent. That should relieve any strain that was causing chafing, ear lobe pain, or headaches.

To get it perfect, you’ll need to know exactly how broad your headband has to be. If you stretch it too far, it will become too loose for you and begin to tumble down. You can create a DIY stretcher out of books once you’ve decided how broad you want it to be. You could also use a box, but the DIY stretcher will be more adaptable if you use books. All you have to do now is gather a few of them and tie them together.

The binder should be about the same width as your head. Put the headset on it as if it were your head once you’re satisfied with its width. It should work after a couple of hours if you leave it there. If the clamping strain of the headphones needs to be loosening any more, add another book and repeat the process.

Warm up the headband a little with your blowdryer. This will make it easier to bend the plastic. You might also submerge it in a stream of warm water. However, avoid soaking up the ear cups!

Replace your in-ear headphones with over-ear headphones

This step is beneficial in a variety of ways. Although I was initially hesitant to change my on-ear headphones, I must confess that it made a significant difference. Because on-ear headphones feature smaller ear cups than over-ear headphones, the clamping pressure is spread out across a smaller area. This style of headset presses directly on the cartilage, causing extra discomfort.

Over-ear headphones, on the other hand, cover a broader area because they are worn around your ears rather than directly on them. In addition, they usually have thicker cushions, which reduce the pressure of the headband. This significantly reduces the discomfort.

As an added plus, over-ear headphones really have stronger noise cancellation, so it’s a win-win situation!

Relax and unwind.

Allowing your ears to rest as much as possible may seem like a no-brainer. If you can’t entirely remove them from your life, at the very least try to switch ears every now and then. You’d still be able to listen to music with one earphone while resting the other.

Alternatively, you might use in-ear headphones instead of over-head headphones to give your outer ear a break. However, for professional gamers, an in-ear pair may not be the greatest solution because it allows in more ambient noise and has inferior sound quality.

Bonus tip: You may also try donning contact lenses instead of spectacles. There will be no temples pressing against your skull this way.

Change the Temples If you’re a woman who wears her glasses while listening to music, you’ll be happy to know that modern glasses makers are increasingly producing frames with interchangeable arms. If your existing pair has thick, library-style stems, you can easily replace them with thinner ones. There will be fewer aches and pains around your ears as a result of this.

You could also inquire as to whether the model of your glasses supports rubber temples. They are exceedingly comfortable to wear and were created specially for persons with similar issues.

Get a Second Pair of Eyeglasses

You might acquire a new set of glasses if your current ones don’t have interchangeable arms. It’s a more expensive alternative, but it could be the ideal excuse to acquire that one frame you’ve been admiring.

Experiment with Neckband Headphones

If you have any extra cash, you might as well check out a neckband headset. These headphones are thought to be minimally inconvenient for users, in addition to providing easier access to controls. They’re especially useful for working out and making frequent, unplanned business calls.

Conclusion

Overall, attempting to figure out how to use your headphones with your spectacles could be a pain. There is, however, a lot you can do about it. You might try resting your ears, adjusting the headband, or switching the arms of your spectacles for a time. You may also buy yourself some new glasses or a new headset. If your over-the-head headphones are causing you pain, consider switching to neckband headphones.

Finally, I hope you enjoyed the article and discovered a solution to this perplexing dilemma. In the comments, let me know what worked for you. Also, don’t forget to tell your friends about the article; it would mean a lot to me!

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